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Tuesday, November 30, 2010

The Thirteen Days of Christmas-Want Change? Create It!

*********There are Gift-Tips under the tree so scroll down to find them.*********

Dealing with career-life situations is challenging, especially when one is unemployed or underemployed. Sometimes, all of life is challenging, very challenging, and nothing seems to be going the way we want things to go. It’s important to put things into perspective, shift our attitude, do things differently, be creative, and change the tradition. And when we do, we discover things can change, life can change, and maybe get better...because we stepped up, and created the change we wanted!

There IS a hidden job market out there, and it's still pouring out jobs--only it's hidden, and Nancy Collamer shares 6 ways to crack this market! Networking is one of the most important ways, and it's useful to view networking as Prospecting for GOLD! Don't be discouraged, and don't give up. Consider doing things differently. Imagine you are only three feet from your gold...and you give up! (Three Feet from Gold: Turn Your Obstacles into Opportunities) So, as the holiday season is now upon us, here are two examples of ways to creatively change the tradition, and some special Gift-Tips wrapped just for you! Please share this with friends who might need some assistance regarding their job search.

The first is "The Thirteen Days of Christmas", that I hope puts things into perspective and lifts your spirits a bit. 

The second is a link, directly under the tree, to a brief and very entertaining music video ("The 12 Days of Christmas") by an acappella group you will truly enjoy! 


Under the tree, you will discover several very helpful Career-Life & Job-Seeking Gift-Tips, a new one appearing every few days throughout this holiday season, posted here on this page, and always under the tree, Gift-Tips for YOU. 

********* There are Gift-Tips under the tree so scroll down to find them. *********
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The Thirteen Days of Christmas
(a suggestion-hum the tune as you read the lyrics)
On the first day of Christmas, 
Mr. Scrooge sent to me 

A pink slip in a pear tree.
On the second day of Christmas, 
Mr. Scrooge sent to me, Two flat tires, 

And a pink slip in a pear tree.
On the third day of Christmas, 
Mr. Scrooge sent to me, 

Three traffic tickets, 
Two flat tires, 

And a pink slip in a pear tree.
On the fourth day of Christmas, 
Mr. Scrooge sent to me,
 
Four bill collectors, 
Three traffic tickets, 
Two flat tires, 

And a pink slip in a pear tree.
On the fifth day of Christmas, 
Mr. Scrooge sent to me, 
Five computer crashes, 

Four bill collectors, 
Three traffic tickets, 
Two flat tires, 


And a pink slip in a pear tree.
On the sixth day of Christmas, 
Mr. Scrooge sent to me, 
Six job rejections, 

Five computer crashes, 
Four bill collectors, 

Three traffic tickets, Two flat tires, 

And a pink slip in a pear tree.
On the seventh day of Christmas, 
Mr. Scrooge sent to me, 
Seven sleepless nights, 
Six job rejections, 
Five computer crashes, 
Four bill collectors, 

Three traffic tickets, 
Two flat tires, 

And a pink slip in a pear tree.

On the eighth day of Christmas, 
Mr. Scrooge sent to me, 
Eight migraine headaches, 
Seven sleepless nights, 
Six job rejections, 
Five computer crashes,
Four bill collectors, 
Three traffic tickets, 
Two flat tires, 


And a pink slip in a pear tree.
On the ninth day of Christmas, 
Mr. Scrooge sent to me, 
a Nine hour snowstorm, Eight migraine headaches, 
Seven sleepless nights, 

Six job rejections, 
Five computer crashes, 
Four bill collectors, 

Three traffic tickets, 
Two flat tires, 

And a pink slip in a pear tree.
On the tenth day of Christmas, 
Mr. Scrooge sent to me, 
Ten hours of back pain,
a Nine hour snowstorm, Eight migraine headaches, 
Seven sleepless nights,
Six job rejections, 
Five computer crashes, 
Four bill collectors, 


Three traffic tickets, 
Two flat tires, 

And a pink slip in a pear tree.
On the eleventh day of Christmas, 
Mr. Scrooge sent to me, 
Eleven telemarketers, 
Ten hours of back pain, 
a Nine hour snowstorm, Eight migraine headaches,
Seven sleepless nights, 
Six job rejections, 
Five computer crashes, 

Four bill collectors, 
Three traffic tickets, 
Two flat tires, 
And a pink slip in a pear tree.
On the twelfth day of Christmas, 
Mr. Scrooge sent to me, 
Twelve terrible nightmares, 
Eleven telemarketers, 
Ten hours of back pain, a Nine hour snowstorm, Eight migraine headaches, 
Seven sleepless nights, 

Six job rejections, 
Five computer crashes, 
Four bill collectors, 

Three traffic tickets, 
Two flat tires, 

And a pink slip in a pear tree.
On the thirteenth day of Christmas 
I did things differently, 
and my true love sent to me,
 
Twelve angles blessing, 
Eleven huggers hugging, 

Ten LinkedIn connections, 
Nine Google searches, 
Eight tweeps a-tweeting, 

Seven days of smiling, 
Six iTunes playing, 
Five new Facebook friends,
Four brand new tires, 

Three French pastries, 
Two Dove chocolates, 


And a one-day job pruning money trees!


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Please enjoy this brief fabulous music video, a new and creative approach to "The Twelve Days of Christmas", and consider discovering creative, maybe non-traditional, career-life strategies this New Year!

During this holiday period, starting today, suggested strategies from myself, including links to excellent posts by my colleagues and others, will be included right here on this page! 

PLEASE USE THE SHARE TAB ON THE RIGHT COLUMN UNDER MY PROFILE PICTURE (Twitter or Facebook) OR E-MAIL YOUR FRIENDS AND COLLEAGUES TO INVITE THEM TO ENJOY THESE GIFT-TIPS! 

I wish you and your loved ones a Blessed and Happy Holiday!  EdC

Career-Life & Job-Seeking Gift-Tips

Starting today, Gift-Tips will begin to appear as this holiday season continues. Each Gift-Tip will be identified by a “Gift-Tip #” followed by a comment, perhaps a link or two that provides useful information, resources, or a related discussion that will be helpful. If you like what you read in a Gift-Tip link, follow that contributor via their Twitter, LinkedIn, Blogger, or social network site. 

Please make a comment, share your own insights/experiences, that contribute to this blog post.

Please indicate the specific Gift-Tip # about which you are commenting.

The more contributions, the more Gift-Tips for EVERYONE under the tree as we all move into this New Year! Thank you. EdC

Gift-Tip #1  Your Two Most Important Questions

The TWO most important questions for making wise and informed career-life decisions, including your consideration to remain in or leave your present job, or if unemployed, preparing and implementing your job-seeking activities, (e.g., networking, resumes, cover letters, and job interviews) are ...

WHO AM I? and WHAT DO I WANT?

Gift-Tip #1 Comment  


Reflecting on these important questions about WHO you are and WHAT you want, involve discernment about your self-knowledge and especially your values. The better you are able to clarify your values and understand yourself, your special skills and talents, your interests, and your values (both your work and life values), the easier you will be able to negotiate your career-life journey with all of its transitions.

Please leave your comments or suggestions that will help others. Thanks!

Gift-Tip #2  Your Cover Letters and Resumes

Once you are clear about who you are (including what you have to offer, your special skills-that’s why they will want you) and what you want (the job and work environment you’re looking for), you’re now ready to communicate that effectively in your cover letters and resumes (yes, you should have several versions), your networking activities, and your job interviews. This Gift-Tip will focus on writing your cover letters and resumes, and following Gift-Tips will discuss networking and job interviewing.

Gift-Tip #2  Comment
Your cover letters and resumes need to be effectively written to stand out above the others and make people want to meet you. Both need to capture sufficient attention that others can't wait to invite you in for a job interview. Both become is your "Willy Wonka Golden Ticket" that gets you into the job interview door!

It is important to have several versions that can be customized to match the specific position to which you are applying. Employers want to know how you  specifically made things better while you were employed at your previous jobs, so make sure to focus on results, what you did and how you made a difference.

If you are asked to submit a cover letter (it's unlikely), then do so. If not, you still might want to submit one and also include your resume. An effective cover letter can result in an interview, especially because it reflects your attitude, how you feel about yourself and your level of enthusiasm about this position you are considering. It further reflects your level of confidence and how you beleive YOU can add value! Crafting a brief cover letter with the right touches that "broadcast" WHO you are and HOW you can add value to the business to which you are applying, "wins" interviews according to Kevin Kermes and his "3 Secrets". Kevin believes that a great cover letter might influence some hiring managers to call you up immediately for an interview without looking at your resume. Perhaps this can occur in some situations, and If I read such a perfect cover letter, I would also choose to read a person's resume.  

While your cover letter needs to reflect that you know sufficient information about the business, which is reflected in how you clearly communicate how you can add value, your resume needs to very specifically match the job you really want according to Mary Bradford who describes her "Mirroring technique." That's why Gift-Tip #1 is a critical first step; knowing WHO you are and WHAT you want. You must also know what the employer needs so you are able to effectively communicate, via your resume, that you have the necessary skill sets to do what the employer needs done. Preliminary research can help you accomplish this so you are better able to effectively communicate your skill sets. One creative technique involves shopping for your target job, before you write your resume, according to Catherine Jewell. Your resume must clearly communicate to the employer that YOU are the best person who can do the job, and she/he NEEDS to hire YOU!

Dawn Rasmussen warns about avoiding obsolete skills and making sure you are specifying current skill sets. While your resume is about you (not Jane, Bradley, or Scott), it's not totally about YOU according to Donna Svei; it's about writing to your target audience so they GET IT and end up hiring YOU. And it's not all over once you've written your resume. You don't just cook the turkey or ham for your holiday meal, and that's it. There's more to do to make it a delicious and memorable meal. Jessica Hernandez offers some useful tips for what to do with your resume after it's polished, and Jim Bright's "Amazing Resumes" contains many ideas and details presented in an enjoyable and motivating format! 

Imagine creating a video resume! Alison Doyle shares some excellent tips and links about this including shooting video for the web and how to get started on YouTube.By the way, if working with vidoe production activities really interests you, contact your local Cable Access TV Station (your local Town Hall Clerk's Office will give you the appropriate information), and inquire about the inexpensive and easy classes to become a Cable Access Producer. You will have access to excellent equipement and also collaborate with others who enjoy similar television productions. 

Creating your resume takes effort, time, and involves a learning curve you prefer to be short, but most likely will be a bit more lengthy than you desire. While you can obtain lots of excellent advice from others throughout this process, you will probably make some mistakes that you will quickly recognize as useful learning experiences, and you will eventually enjoy success! Once your resume is completed, it will be easier to create various versions that best match specific jobs that interest you. 

Please leave your comments or suggestions that will help others. Thanks!

Gift-Tip #3  Networking


The single most important key to effective networking is your belief that your success is tied to others and ultimately, your ability to engage others as your personal job-search advocates, your guides to help you discover future job interviews!

Gift-Tip #3  Comment
If you don't believe this, you will most likely be unsuccessful with your networking activities. The following is an oversimplification, but perhaps useful to put things into perspective. Sometimes a brief story helps. 

Consider your resume to be the "golden key" that opens the job interview door, and the job interview is simply a meeting during which you have the opportunity to tell your story, i.e., effectively make your case why YOU are the best person with the right skill sets to do the job that needs to be done.

But, you’re not quite certain where those job interview doors are. You’ve heard lots about the “hidden job market” where most of the jobs are, and you know you‘ll find many job interview doors there, that your golden key will open! But how do you discover the secret location of this hidden job market where you’ll find all these job interview doors? You search for an answer and don’t get anywhere. 

You call 911, and they don’t know what you’re talking about. You visit a tea-leaf reader and are told you need to purchase a magic potion, drink it, and you will be enlightened. You’re feeling discouraged because you have the golden key, and all you need is to discover the hidden job market and all those interview doors! 

And then one morning, as you are in line for your coffee and muffin, a stranger in front of you turns around after purchasing her coffee, hands you a little note folded up, and says, “Just find yours!”, and quickly walks on, becoming totally invisible in the crowd within seconds. 

You open the note, and it reads, “Personal Guide!” 

After a few minutes sitting down alone, reflecting on your strange note, you finally GET IT! You need a personal guide to help you discover this hidden job market and those interview doors. After all, you already have the golden key, your resume!

Imagine the only way to get a job is to accomplish the following three tasks:

a) Get that golden key by writing an effective a resume. (Gift-Tip #2)
b) Meet the right people who will become your personal guides who will assist you with locating the interview doors in that hidden job market by getting your resume into the hands of someone they know will be able to directly help you.
c) Have a successful interview.

Part of successful networking is being in the right place to meet the right people who might be able to serve you as your "guides" to those interview doors. Joe Grimm reminds us that people who are in the right place are there because they are smart as well as lucky!

Networking is an activity that can cause anxiety for some people who might feel shy and uncomfortable speaking to strangers, or even asking for help from friends. Reading about suggested ways to improve one's networking success can be very helpful. Stephanie Speisman shares 10 useful Tips for Successful Business Networking and a few excellent links related to networking. Another very helpful resource is a post by James Clear in which he lists and discusses "24 Networking Tips That Actually Work". 

Finally, Jenna Goudreau offers some "foolproof" advice based on discussions between ForbesWoman and various experts in the field, including several related links for further reading.

Networking is all about relationships, and relationships are the basis of most everything that affects us throughout our daily lives, and certainly our job-seeking activities. Believe in yourself and the fact that you deserve success, and you are off to a great start with your networking activities!

Please leave your comments or suggestions that will help others. Thanks!

Gift-Tip #4  Job Interviews

Your job interview is primarily to “tell your story” (what you have to offer that
your potential employer wants) , “interview” your potential employer/or representative such as a hiring manager (to make sure you truly want to work in that company, doing that job), and assuming you still want the job, stand out above the competition (make a great impression), get a job offer (that allows you to then negotiate your salary/benefits, etc.), and be hired!
Gift-Tip #4 Comment 
You must use your job interview to clearly communicate who you are (skill sets you have to offer) and what you want (that specific job at that specific company).

It’s equally important to clearly assess both the potential employer and work culture (interview your potential employer) to obtain as accurate a picture as possible, what it would be like to work for that employer in that work environment. Prior research will help so your questions are precisely targeted to obtain the information you need, enjoy an effective interview discussion, and be in a position to eventually to make a wise decision.

The key to an effective interview is being prepared, and being prepared means TIME ON TASK! Role-playing with a career counselor/coach or other appropriate person will help.

One of my clients informed me he was going to have a final interview, including a salary negotiation component, while his potential employer was in her car, driving! When he arrived at my office for some role-playing, just before we began, I noticed his eyes were open, and he was looking at me to observe my body language (normally a wise strategy). But he would NOT be seeing his potential employer’s body language since she was in another state, and she would be driving in her rental car! So I asked him to close his eyes, and we then proceeded to role-play. After a few practices with some feedback, he felt confident, did very well on the interview, and secured both the job and the salary he desired.

There are different types of interviews, and Tom Denham stresses it’s important to ask about the structure of your interview prior to your meeting, so you can be fully prepared to do your best. And once your interview is completed, there are important follow-up activities to consider as Peggy McKee advises.

Making arrangements for your job interviews, preparing with diligence, doing research, having your interviews, doing appropriate follow-up activities, all of these steps and more, take effort, time, and a learning curve you want to be short, but most likely, will be more lengthy than you desire. Experience is a great teacher. While you can get lots of excellent advice throughout this process, you will probably make some mistakes that you very quickly will recognize as wonderful learning experiences. And you’ll do a better job next time and eventually enjoy success! Good Luck! EdC

Please leave your comments or suggestions that will help others. Thanks!

Gift-Tip #5  Getting A Job Offer
A job offer is great news, but treat it wisely. You can usually accept the “job offer”, and not necessarily the “job”, allowing important considerations to blossom during your “negotiation window, before you finally accept the job.

Gift-Tip #5 Comment 
Congratulations! You have a job offer! Maybe you have more than one!!  Now what? Remember, once you get that job offer, they are psychologically invested in YOU, so you now have some power! Use it wisely.

First, a quick review to put things in perspective ...

You initially used your self-knowledge (“who am I” and “what do I want” reflections-Gift-Tip #1) as a starting point to begin your job search. You carefully crafted different versions of your resume that effectively describes your skill-sets and how they exactly match what the employer needs (your Golden Ticket to eventually get through the job interview doors-see Gift-Tip #3).

You also effectively reached out and created your own network of personal advocates who guided you to the various job-interview doors-Gift-Tip #2). 
You completed several successful job interviews, primarily to “tell your story” (what you have to offer that your potential employer wants), and you did a great job of “interviewing” your potential employer/or representative such as a hiring manager, to make sure you truly wanted to work in that company, doing that job!

You successfully stood out above the competition and got a job offer!

Now you must negotiate your salary/benefits/perks, etc., and be hired!
Prior research will help you with evaluating your job offers and negotiating your salary. Sometimes you are faced with negotiating your salary during your final job interview, because you are offered the job and salary proposal, on the spot! This might involve you making a counter proposal to the salary proposal presented to you, and your conversation needs to be carefully articulated with “graciousness, firmness, and diplomacy” as Pat Goodwin discusses in her videos.
 
It’s important to have a strategy, (based on research) that facilitates successfully negotiating salary/benefits, etc., during your job offer. Other times, depending on circumstances, you can use different strategies to negotiate salary/benefits, etc. after your job offer.

Remember my client’s situation described in Gift-Tip # 4, when he was facing his final interview, including a salary negotiation component, while his potential employer was in her rental car, in another state!

Want success? Be prepared, be assertive, be gracious, be flexible, be enthusiastic, and be authentic! Good Luck! 

Please leave your comments or suggestions that will help others. Thanks!

Gift-Tip #6  Considering Your Job Offer

Now that you have accepted the “job offer”, and not necessarily the “job”, you need to take sufficient time to fully evaluate the offer, before making your final decision to actually accept the offer.

Gift-Tip #6 Comment
Remember, once you get that job offer, they are psychologically invested in YOU, so you now have some power! Use it wisely.

It’s time to carefully evaluate the offer to make certain this IS the right offer for you. Most employers will give you reasonable time to consider their offer.

Remember, they want you; that's why they gave you the offer. Now they are wondering, “Will you accept the offer?”!

They might assume you will accept the offer, but they won’t know for sure until you DO accept the offer. That’s why you now have some power.

Research will help you evaluate your job offer based on your “bottom line” regarding compensation, benefits, and other requirements, even though you might have thought you already made up your mind regarding these considerations. There’s something about a genuine job offer that causes your world to suddenly change; a sort of wake-up call that is “a cause for pause”!

You need to make sure you want to proceed ahead, and clearly know what to consider before accepting your job offer.

Does your offer cover all the basics you need and some that your might want (e.g., salary, benefits, etc.)? Does your offer cover some other important considerations (e.g., bonuses, stock options, insurance, vacation time, maternity leave, etc.)?

Diligence is important for your eventual success, so take time to research, reflect, and make your final decision. Good Luck! 

Please leave your comments or suggestions that will help others. Thanks!

Gift-Tip #7  Accepting Your Job Offer

Now that you have taken sufficient time to fully evaluate the offer, and you feel ready to actually accept the offer, take one last pause to briefly review all the variables, talk to a counselor/coach or good friend, sleep on it, and then take action-accept the offer!

Gift-Tip #7 Comment
Remember, you have done your research, you have done the best you can to negotiate your best salary, compensation packages, other desirables, and you feel satisfied with the results of your research and your discussions with your employer.

AND, you are feeling so lucky to finally HAVE a job offer! So why not just call them up right away, and say, “YES!”?

It’s the perfect time to pause, review everything one last time, speak to a career counselor/coach, or good friend, and then sleep on it...before accepting a job offer.

If you have any doubts, try and figure out what’s holding you back, and discuss this with your counselor/coach. It may be helpful to contact your employer and have an honest conversation about your concerns.

If you believe you are ready, it’s time to accept the job offer and withdraw from the job search. Congratulations and Good Luck! EdC

Please leave your comments or suggestions that will help others. Thanks! 

Gift-Tip #8  Turning Down A Job Offer-After Accepting It!

Once you verbally accept a job offer, have second thoughts, and decide you do not want to accept the offer, you must withdraw your initial acceptance quickly, effectively, and graciously.
  
Gift-Tip #8 Comment  

Oops! You worked so hard to do everything correctly, you nailed the interview, got the job offer, and accepted the job offer...and for some important reason(s), you strongly believe you must now decline that same offer you just accepted!

Once you verbally accept a job offer, and have second thoughts, don’t decline the offer without careful reflection. This situation is awkward, at best, and you must deal with this difficult situation quickly, effectively, and graciously. You must have a plan to turn down a job offer after acceptance.

You do not want to burn bridges. It is possible that your discussion with your “almost” employer might result in your decision to actually accept the original job offer. You need to have an important discussion with your employer, and you need to be clear about the main reasons for having second thoughts.

Remember, it’s not the end of the world, and while you want to be making sure you do the right thing for yourself, you also need to be mature and professional about how you handle the situation, including showing consideration for your employer. Good Luck! 

Please leave your comments or suggestions that will help others. Thanks!

Gift-Tip #9  Getting Off to A Great Start On Your New Job!   

Once you are in your new job, use your limited “honeymoon” period to accomplish some important groundwork for a successful start to what hopefully will be, a new, exciting, and fulfilling work experience, and consider this employment as a “bridge job-a paid internship-along the career path you are successfully navigating!

Gift-Tip #9 Comment 


Congratulations! You finally have a job you like. You accomplished a major task, especially during a most challenging economic period where unemployment has hit some uncomfortable highs for far too long and is finally improving.

Your resume served you well, as did the network of personal advocates you successfully created, who guided you to those job interviews, some of which were in that “hidden job market”. Your ability to “tell your story” and inform your employer about how you were the best person for the job were impressive, and you effectively negotiated a compensation plan that you believe to be fair. 

You will learn new skill sets that will be added to your resume. You will make new friends and add many contacts to your expanding personal network, to be used in future job-seeking activities. Take time to nurture these contacts.

You now have about a month to get off to a great start, perform your work tasks with integrity, be authentic, be friendly, work independently and as an effective team member, and earn the respect of your employer and fellow employees. Tom Denham offers some excellent suggestions to help you construct your framework for success during the first 30 days

* Remember, you will probably have a minimum of 7-10 jobs and more in your work role before you retire and spend more time in your leisure role and other life roles. These jobs will probably be in 2-3, maybe even 4, different occupational fields such as education or marketing, or wellness, etc., and you’ll probably work until you are about 70 years young—so you might as well enjoy what you do as you constantly learn new skill sets and make yourself competitive for your next employment situation.

* Your current job is most likely a “bridge-job”, a "paid internship", that hopefully brings you satisfaction, sufficient income, and prepares you for the next part of your career-life journey.

* Please visit my Helpful Resources for some excellent links that each offer many more useful and easy-to-navigate links for adults and youth, including national and local job search tools, actual job openings, salary information, occupational training and educational information, college and apprecticeship opportunities, and much information about specific industries, financial aid, veterans, special needs populations, and lots more.  

* An enjoyable way to connect with others with similar interests is OpenCollegesBlog, an on-line community geared around personal and career development topics. Here you can read engaging blogs about a wide variety of topics and open conversations with individuals working in industires and various work settings in which you might have an interest.  

* My good friend and colleague, Stevie Pucketreminds people to keep positive and upbeat during their job-seeking activities because your attitude affects your outcome. She combines her wonderful creativity and superb web design talents with her desire to help others build satisfying careers. Please visit her site for excellent links and resources that will keep you positive and move your forward in your career-life journey!

Finally, always remember to be enthusiastic, work with integrity, be kind, and be gracious. Learn to accept yourself, and learn to truly LOVE yourself and listen attentively to your True Self despite any perceived "brokeness", something we all share as humans throughout our life journey and many transitions. The more we accept our "humaness" and also take time to discover our magnificence, the more we can realize the Power of ONE that is within each of us. No one is without their special magnificence! Each of us IS here for a reason! 

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Connecting with Ed 

Please feel free to ask a question or make a comment. If you do not want to leave your name, you may simply make your comment as "anonymous". Also please share this website or post with friends or colleagues who might be interested.

If you are interested in a special post and video I have on the Deepak Chopra Well World site, click The Power of ONESpirit Video to access a unique video inspired by the USA 911 experience that is free and can be used by anyone in any country as a resource for promoting greater understanding for youth and adults about multicultural differences and conflicts, including faith traditions.

* In early 2014 I will be posting a free six-part video series called Creating Careers with Confidence, that provides an enjoyable and informative research-based discussion and PowerPoint covering The ABC's of Making Career-Life Choices, including a special video for parents and educators.

** Please visit this link for some year-round Gift-Tips under the Christmas Tree and enjoyable videos for adults and youth needing ideas and resources related to the job search including networking, resumes, job interviews, accepting and declining job offers, etc.

*** I am available for in-person or distance support and/or motivational presentations with adults and youth regarding topics in my posts, and offer a complimentary phone "mini-assessment" for those who might be interested in career-life counseling/coaching.

Please e-mail me and leave your best phone and time to call, and I will be happy to call you back if you are in the USA. Skype is also an option for anyone in the USA or abroad.

Contact me directly at (781) 721-1200 or careercoachcolozzi@verizon.net 
Day, evening or weekend appointments are available.




Thank you and warm regards, EdC 

4 comments:

  1. Ed,

    Both you and someone I met today inspired a new blog, although I was considering shutting it down -- http://foxmancommunications.blogspot.com/2011/03/are-you-reaching-out.html. Thank you for all you are doing and have done for me and for so many others. You are living your life's work and helping others will be your legacy.

    Warm regards

    John Fox
    SLC, UT -- USA

    ReplyDelete
  2. Thank you John, I appreciate you and your comment as well:)
    Warm regards, EdC

    ReplyDelete
  3. I attended a workshop for career networking today which you gave a talk about discovering your skills, interests and value. It was extremely informative and very inspiring. As a recently displaced employee, I found your presentation encouraging and useful. I met several people who even had leads for me. Keep up the great work. Thank you Ed.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Dear Anonoymous,
    You are most welcome:) Thanks for taking the time to comment, and I am gald you enjoyed the workshop. Regards, EdC

    ReplyDelete